Tuesday, August 16, 2005

Wireless Week
www.wirelessweek.com
Includes ASP and Billing Vendors directories
Mobilss
http://www.mobliss.com/products/ringtones/
Develops ringtones and graphics—from the hippest music through custom creation—as well as a host of distribution options.

Distribution options for ringtones and graphics:

Mobile storefronts
Mobliss creates WAP sites through which mobile users can download ringtones and graphics, and can brand these offerings in several creative ways. Through micro-browser artist channels, or fan packs, Mobliss also offers content bundles centered around music genres or specific artists. These channels contain unique editorial content, graphics, tones, video and audio clips, as well as integrated messaging and community elements. Mobliss recently launched a WAP storefront on mymmode.com from Cingular Wireless.

Web-based mobile storefronts
We build and host Web storefronts that give mobile users easy access to music, images, and information alerts from their favorite artists, sports teams, and publications. We work closely with our clients to ensure a superb user experience.

BREW applications
Leveraging our BREW experience, we produce graphics, wallpaper, ringtone applications, and games for brands and media companies.

Friday, August 05, 2005

Magic Ziller Joy - karaoke ringtone service
Posted Jun 14, 2005, 11:54 AM ET by Barb DybwadRelated entries: Cellphones

We just weren’t satisfied with the karaoke phone, nor the karaoke video service — what we really wanted was a way to DIY our ringtones with the smooth golden magic of our own voices. Leave it to Korean provider KTF to give us the goods in the form of a service called Magic Ziller Joy (how can you go wrong?). Users record their, um, masterpieces at karaoke machines operated by TJ Media, a karaoke content provider, and download the results as ringtones. It sure beats Crazy Frog... we hope.[Via ringtonia]
TDK Free Styla - possible partner

TDK Free Styla claims to bring P2P to cellphones
Posted May 24, 2004, 8:25 AM ET by Alberto EscarlateRelated entries: Misc. Gadgets, Wireless
This Bluetooth USB dongle for PCs is exactly the same as the one you might already have but TDK is marketing it with a different spin. They’re pitching it as a cheaper way to transfer downloaded pics and ringtones than using airtime to do it and that you can use it in conjunction with Kazaa and other P2P applications to download ringtones and other content for free rather than purchase it the regular way.They’re also bundling it with a software application that helps users manage and sync phone contacts, ringtones, and text messages with a PC, and they’re marketing it to an audience that has probably never used Bluetooth with their phones and PCs. Costs about 50% more than a regular BT dongle.
Xingtone - converts songs from your collection into master tones. Or you can do it yourself: some new cell-phone models can be connected to a computer by a data cable, allowing you to create master tones from MP3 files at home. However it is done, transferring music that you own to your phone is legal under copyright law.
"..record labels get twenty-five per cent of every master-tone sale ... A lot of these aggregator companies were very early players, essentially beholden to the major record labels and the music publishers to get the rights they needed. And, in this country, the music business is a very mature and consolidated business—somewhat collusive, in fact. The aggregators accepted rates and terms that they really didn’t have to accept, and agreed to license the music in such a way that they’re overpaying by a tremendous multiple.”

new yorker
Master tone ringtones
In the United States, master tones can be played only on phones available for the last year and a half, yet they already account for nearly fifty per cent of ringtone sales.

from new yorker
Can we say advertisers' mecca?
“I spent three days of productive work time listening to polyphonic ringtone versions of speed metal, trying to find exactly the ringtone that expressed my personality with enough irony and enough coolness that I could live with it going off ten times a day. .."

From New Yorker
Ringtones generated four billion dollars in sales around the world in 2004. The United States accounted for only three hundred million of these dollars, although Consect predicts that the figure will double this year.

New Yorker quoting Consect - a marketing and consulting firm based in NY

RING MY BELL
The expensive pleasures of the ringtone.
by SASHA FRERE-JONES
Issue of 2005-03-07Posted 2005-02-28
Cingular convinces bands to release songs as ringtones before singles
Posted Apr 12, 2005, 4:26 PM ET by Peter RojasRelated entries: Cellphones

Usually people like to, you know, actually know a song before they’ll drop $2.49 on a ringtone, but Cingular is flipping things around a bit, and have cut a deal with several different artists to get them to release their new songs as ringtones before they hit radio. First up is Coldplay, you’ll be able to get their new song “Speed of Sound” as a ringtone six days before it gets played on the radio and a couple of months before their new album comes out in June. Probably not a bad little experiment, especially given how much money the record labels are making off of ringtones these days (inexplicably, people will pay more for a 30-second ringtone of a song than they’ll pay for the song itself).

From Engadget
From Engadget
Freevibe, where to go for free anti-drug ringtones
Posted Apr 19, 2005, 9:15 PM ET by Ryan BlockRelated entries: Cellphones
Ringtones of hymns, breast-enhancing ringtones, and pheromone ringtones be damned; now anti-drug ringtones, yes! What’s more, the Prez is on the case with Freevibe, the ringtone-toting online wing of the Office of National Drug Control Policy. Hit it up, get the data you need on the drugs you should apparently flush down the toilet (”just say no” gets you nowhere these days) and get the message they tryin’ to bring to the streets: ringtones, Engadget’s anti-drug.[Via BoingBoing]
From Engadget:

Forget implants: the breast enlarging ringtone
Posted Sep 24, 2004, 8:31 AM ET by Peter RojasRelated entries: Cellphones

So Hideto Tomabechi, one of the guys who helped deprogram members of the Aum Shinrikyo cult in Japan, has started selling a ringtone that he says will make your breasts grow larger just by listening to it, something which should make it very popular with the ladies (guys, you’re gonna want to carry some earplugs just in case). Fortunately there are customer testimonials in case you were worried about this thing being legit or not, and Tomabechi says it’s really simple, that he just uses sounds that “make the brain and body move unconsciously. It’s a technique involving subliminal effects,” that’s like “positive brainwashing.” If getting all busty through a ringtone isn’t your bag, he also ringtones on the way that’ll improve your memory, make you more attractive to the opposite sex, cure baldness, and help you give up smoking. Ringtones, man, ringtones.
UPDATE: Wanna hear what it sounds like? Click here.
Dubya Ringtones at "WFMU's Beware of the Blog": http://blog.wfmu.org/freeform/2005/07/answer_the_phon.html
WFMU is an independent freeform radio station broadcasting at 91.1 fm in the New York City area

Tuesday, February 01, 2005

To win the ground war, Democrats need to create the equivalent of the Repbulican's church network. David Moberg in Lessons from Labor in Nation (12/27/04) discusses how Reps replicated labor's organizing tactics and were aided by church network. Moberg argues Dems need to do the same but doesn't say how they can succeed as well w/o their own church network:

"If Democrats hope to win in the future, it's important that they learn at least two lessons from the union effort. First, ongoing organization and direct, personal contact with voters are crucial. Both Democratic Party organization and voter party identification have slipped drastically in recent decades. This year new groups, like ACT, inspired by labor's success in recent elections, took on some traditional party tasks of registering, educating and mobilizing voters. But Bush won partly because Republicans, learning as well from labor, mounted a massive volunteer mobilization effort that was complemented by conservative churches, the GOP's counterpart to organized labor."

Monday, January 31, 2005

How about an open source "Capitol Advantage" Killer

Hansan Holds E-Advocacy Advantage

From Washington Post - K Street Confidential by Jeffrey Birnbaum
Monday, January 24, 2005; Page E01

By Jeffrey H. BirnbaumMonday, January 24, 2005; Page E01
In 1986, Robert Hansan was about to graduate from college, his girlfriend was pregnant and he didn't have a job. But he did have an idea. Encouraged by a brother who worked for a printer, he decided to publish a directory of members of Congress and sell it to trade associations as a kind of party favor.

Today, Hansan's Fairfax company, Capitol Advantage LLC, all but owns the lucrative market in congressional directories and that's the least of his renown. In the late 1990s, he transformed that prosaic business into a rudiment of Internet lobbying, which is now the fastest growing and arguably the most potent form of persuasion in the nation's capital.

"Bob was a pioneer," said Sheeraz Haji, chief executive of GetActive Software Inc., of Berkeley, Calif., a Capitol Advantage competitor in cyber-advocacy. "He's shaped the market where we are today."

Hansan's influence is ubiquitous -- and anonymous. If you've ever e-mailed your representatives or learned about them online, chances are that you did so through Capitol Advantage without knowing it. Here's how it works:
Go to a variety of Web sites such as America Online, Yahoo, MSN, the New York Times or USA
Today -- or to the sites of 1,300 lobbying groups (including AARP, the American Bankers Association and the League of Conservation Voters). Search for information on Congress, politics or Washington advocacy. Then type in your Zip code and out will spew a wealth of information about your legislators and an easy way to contact them.

Last year, those few keystrokes led to 18 million e-mails to lawmakers and other officials. This year, the number will be even higher. And unless you look at each site's fine print, you'd never realize that Hansan's company powered them all.

Capitol Advantage wasn't the first company to use a Zip code system (though it popularized it). It isn't the only firm that facilitates e-mailing to Congress (though it is, by far, the largest.) Yet its program's simplicity, accuracy and low cost have made it a foundation of cyber-democracy -- and made Hansan a rich man.

No one could have imagined any of that at the beginning. "I didn't start this company because I had a grand idea," Hansan said from his spacious office. "I started the company because I needed to support a family."

In four months, at age 21, Hansan had a son, got married, graduated from Virginia Commonwealth University and started a company. He moved into his parents' home in McLean, borrowed $10,000 from his father Jack (a longtime Ohio politico) and trudged from one corporate office to another trying to sell a publication that didn't exist anywhere but in his dreams.

Hansan turned out to be both lucky and skilled. The two firms that were producing directories at the time were mediocre, and the corporations and associations that bought the books were eager for an alternative supplier. Hansan was a tireless salesman even though all he had to show potential clients was a prototype with blank pages. After numerous rejections, ARCO, Northrop, and the Society of Professional Benefit Administrators gave him his first orders.

Two exhausting years later, Capitol Advantage's sales were brisk enough for Hansan and his young family to move out of his parents' house and for him to hire his first full-time employee:
Sherry Stanley, his college roommate's girlfriend. By 1993, revenue topped $1 million and the next year he bought out one of his rivals. Capitol Advantage now publishes up to 500,000 books a year in five versions, and Stanley is senior vice president for sales and marketing. Jack Hansan now works for his son.

But the directories were only the first chapter in the Capitol Advantage saga. In 1996, Hansan was confronted by the Internet boom. He understood that his business might soon become obsolete unless he acted. But how? He struggled for months to figure a way to transfer his directories to Web sites and still make a buck.
Finally, his oldest brother, John, offered the insight he needed. "Just build a directory online," he said, "and charge for its use."

That's pretty much what Hansan had been doing for years with his paper directories. He wrote and printed a basic book and then customized its cover with the names and logos of the organizations that purchased it. The organizations would then hand them out as gifts as if they were their own.

Hansan decided to do the same online. He converted his congressional information into an Internet-ready package and, for a fee, dressed it up to look like it belonged to the company or association on whose Web site it appeared. The more groups that used the service, the more money his company made. By adding data down to the local level, Capitol Advantage quickly became the industry standard for politics.

C-Span was its first Web client and hundreds of other groups soon followed. When the e-mail wave hit, Hansan rode its crest by adding the Zip code function. His lowly directories, once threatened with extinction by the Web, instead became the hottest tool in online advocacy thanks to a burst of innovation and clever early planning.

Lawmakers weren't always thrilled by the extra attention that Hansan's products brought. He had already angered them by publishing their office fax numbers in his print directories. The resulting deluge of faxes almost overwhelmed them. The flood of e-mails that followed his foray into the Internet wreaked similar havoc.

But Hansan was unrepentant. He believed that he had a responsibility to empower people to contact their government officials. "We are very committed to making sure that people have an opportunity to have their say," he said. In 1999, he started a cutting-edge Internet lobbying shop called e-Advocates to explore new ways to apply political pressure. His partner in that venture is a former client, Pam Fielding, who once headed the online advocacy program of the National Education Association.

These days most of Capitol Advantage's more than $10 million in annual revenue and 70 person staff come from the electronic side of the business. And Hansan, though only 40 years old (and still married), is considered a grizzled veteran of the Web. "In this space, I'm like a grandfather," he said. "Most people don't know I'm still very young."

And he says he isn't through breaking new ground. He also makes time for a hobby: owning racehorses. He hopes that someday, one of them will win the Kentucky Derby. If it does, it won't be hard to spot. Hansan's silks are black and gold, the colors of his alma mater.
How about an open source "Capitol Advantage" Killer

Hansan Holds E-Advocacy Advantage

From Washington Post - K Street Confidential by Jeffrey Birnbaum
Monday, January 24, 2005; Page E01

By Jeffrey H. BirnbaumMonday, January 24, 2005; Page E01
In 1986, Robert Hansan was about to graduate from college, his girlfriend was pregnant and he didn't have a job. But he did have an idea. Encouraged by a brother who worked for a printer, he decided to publish a directory of members of Congress and sell it to trade associations as a kind of party favor.

Today, Hansan's Fairfax company, Capitol Advantage LLC, all but owns the lucrative market in congressional directories and that's the least of his renown. In the late 1990s, he transformed that prosaic business into a rudiment of Internet lobbying, which is now the fastest growing and arguably the most potent form of persuasion in the nation's capital.

"Bob was a pioneer," said Sheeraz Haji, chief executive of GetActive Software Inc., of Berkeley, Calif., a Capitol Advantage competitor in cyber-advocacy. "He's shaped the market where we are today."

Hansan's influence is ubiquitous -- and anonymous. If you've ever e-mailed your representatives or learned about them online, chances are that you did so through Capitol Advantage without knowing it. Here's how it works:
Go to a variety of Web sites such as America Online, Yahoo, MSN, the New York Times or USA
Today -- or to the sites of 1,300 lobbying groups (including AARP, the American Bankers Association and the League of Conservation Voters). Search for information on Congress, politics or Washington advocacy. Then type in your Zip code and out will spew a wealth of information about your legislators and an easy way to contact them.

Last year, those few keystrokes led to 18 million e-mails to lawmakers and other officials. This year, the number will be even higher. And unless you look at each site's fine print, you'd never realize that Hansan's company powered them all.

Capitol Advantage wasn't the first company to use a Zip code system (though it popularized it). It isn't the only firm that facilitates e-mailing to Congress (though it is, by far, the largest.) Yet its program's simplicity, accuracy and low cost have made it a foundation of cyber-democracy -- and made Hansan a rich man.

No one could have imagined any of that at the beginning. "I didn't start this company because I had a grand idea," Hansan said from his spacious office. "I started the company because I needed to support a family."

In four months, at age 21, Hansan had a son, got married, graduated from Virginia Commonwealth University and started a company. He moved into his parents' home in McLean, borrowed $10,000 from his father Jack (a longtime Ohio politico) and trudged from one corporate office to another trying to sell a publication that didn't exist anywhere but in his dreams.

Hansan turned out to be both lucky and skilled. The two firms that were producing directories at the time were mediocre, and the corporations and associations that bought the books were eager for an alternative supplier. Hansan was a tireless salesman even though all he had to show potential clients was a prototype with blank pages. After numerous rejections, ARCO, Northrop, and the Society of Professional Benefit Administrators gave him his first orders.

Two exhausting years later, Capitol Advantage's sales were brisk enough for Hansan and his young family to move out of his parents' house and for him to hire his first full-time employee:
Sherry Stanley, his college roommate's girlfriend. By 1993, revenue topped $1 million and the next year he bought out one of his rivals. Capitol Advantage now publishes up to 500,000 books a year in five versions, and Stanley is senior vice president for sales and marketing. Jack Hansan now works for his son.

But the directories were only the first chapter in the Capitol Advantage saga. In 1996, Hansan was confronted by the Internet boom. He understood that his business might soon become obsolete unless he acted. But how? He struggled for months to figure a way to transfer his directories to Web sites and still make a buck.
Finally, his oldest brother, John, offered the insight he needed. "Just build a directory online," he said, "and charge for its use."

That's pretty much what Hansan had been doing for years with his paper directories. He wrote and printed a basic book and then customized its cover with the names and logos of the organizations that purchased it. The organizations would then hand them out as gifts as if they were their own.

Hansan decided to do the same online. He converted his congressional information into an Internet-ready package and, for a fee, dressed it up to look like it belonged to the company or association on whose Web site it appeared. The more groups that used the service, the more money his company made. By adding data down to the local level, Capitol Advantage quickly became the industry standard for politics.

C-Span was its first Web client and hundreds of other groups soon followed. When the e-mail wave hit, Hansan rode its crest by adding the Zip code function. His lowly directories, once threatened with extinction by the Web, instead became the hottest tool in online advocacy thanks to a burst of innovation and clever early planning.

Lawmakers weren't always thrilled by the extra attention that Hansan's products brought. He had already angered them by publishing their office fax numbers in his print directories. The resulting deluge of faxes almost overwhelmed them. The flood of e-mails that followed his foray into the Internet wreaked similar havoc.

But Hansan was unrepentant. He believed that he had a responsibility to empower people to contact their government officials. "We are very committed to making sure that people have an opportunity to have their say," he said. In 1999, he started a cutting-edge Internet lobbying shop called e-Advocates to explore new ways to apply political pressure. His partner in that venture is a former client, Pam Fielding, who once headed the online advocacy program of the National Education Association.

These days most of Capitol Advantage's more than $10 million in annual revenue and 70 person staff come from the electronic side of the business. And Hansan, though only 40 years old (and still married), is considered a grizzled veteran of the Web. "In this space, I'm like a grandfather," he said. "Most people don't know I'm still very young."

And he says he isn't through breaking new ground. He also makes time for a hobby: owning racehorses. He hopes that someday, one of them will win the Kentucky Derby. If it does, it won't be hard to spot. Hansan's silks are black and gold, the colors of his alma mater.

Thursday, January 20, 2005

From Personal Democracy Forum
With New Tools, Record Number of Young Voters Choose (and Lose)
By Jed Miller, 01/10/2005

"CIRCLE says turnout for voters under 30 rose more than 9% between 2000 and 2004, and reached the "highest levels in more than a decade." The 9% figure is also four points higher than the estimated 5% increase in overall turnout reported by the Committee for the Study of the American Electorate..."

Quote from MTV’s V.P. for Public Affairs Ian Rowe, "It shows that the increase in youth turnout kept pace or surpassed the increase in other age groups..."

"There’s no question that the Internet played a big role for us," said MTV’s V.P. for Public Affairs Ian Rowe the week before the election. Governor Dean may not have won Iowa, but "he definitely affected how technology is used, and since young people are usually first users, they’re definitely engaged when candidates use those technologies."

Response to Chris Nolan post, Amanda Toering of SpeakSpeak describes her project as "a very action-oriented alternative to MoveOn." Is that what we're talking about?
From Personal Democracy Forum
Democrats and Their Netroots: Needed, A Culture of Trust
By Matt Stoller, 01/15/2005

Matt refers to a Kos posting where he refers to the Kerrry netroots supporters that felt like ATMs. "Those supporters who felt ignored during the election season speak of feeling treated like ATMs, sent fundraising email after fundraising email and nothing more.."

See http://www.dailykos.com/story/2004/12/20/134325/64 (kos attacks Exley who was unfortunately misquoted as saying that the internet tools didn't help) for more of the original Kos post where he also says, "Unlike Kerry's effort, what Dean and Trippi built was the stuff of political movements, and it was built on a foundation of communication. Exley can laugh this off all he wants, but the Kerry campaign never came close to matching up."
From Personal Democracy Forum:
MoveOn.org: No Longer a Start-up or an Upstart (Part II)
By Chris Nolan, 12/23/2004

Following quote exmplifies how MoveOn encourages progressives to participate in MoveOn's agenda, not puruse their own agenda.
"MoveOn seems to me to be sort of perfect example of how NOT to get people involved in politics," one DailyKos member recently wrote... "What MoveOn wants, it seems to me, is for people to send them money, and sign online petitions. MoveOn wants to WRITE the petitions, and MoveOn wants to decide WHO gets the money. It's not democratic. Beyond saying, "Yes, I'll sign", or, "Where should I send the money?" MoveOn doesn't want any member participation."

Compare this to quote from Blades earlier in the article:

"Our job is to listen to our members and help them engage in the political process as best they can..."

Is their unidirectional approach to agenda setting, really the best they can do?

Wednesday, January 19, 2005

1/19 - Marty Kearns posting to nten listserv
Marty responds to email from individual who is dismayed by how many people requested to be taken off his enewsletter list. Marty responded by saying that people suffer from info overload and need more control over their inputs. Open CitizenSpeak encourages individuals to come back to an org's site b/c they are creating the content not passively receiving it.


Stephen,
This trend is not good or bad for causes (the huge rapid response is good). It is merely a reflection of a changing dynamic in society, we live in the age of connectivity and information overload. A huge segment of people (those connected and comfortable enough to make online donations) feel they need to control the flow of information into their lives. They don't see a newsletter as a perk and they want to help without being pestered. The public is increasingly demanding of instant results, impulsive and overloaded with everything.
At N-ten meetings (NYC- Seth Godin) discussed the death of the brand and mass market approach. Howard Riengold (SF- Nten) discussed the "swarm" dynamics of society. At each regional N-ten Andy Stocking and I have been exploring Advocacy in the Age of Connectivity to specifically dig into this topic and the role that social networks and groups have in organizing in the future.
Robert Putnam discussed the non-joiner trends in "Bowling Alone" and there have been lots of discussions about the stagnation of membership (by % nationally) in many circles and many communities.
The are lessons to learn.
Groups must redesign strategy for this new age and move away from 100% reliance on the tradition concepts of "membership" as the sole basis for power to do work.
New network based organizing strategies are going to be an increasing asset in the work that our sector performs (Tsunami Relief, Wal-Mart campaigns, Political campaigns, Health responses, etc) and we all need to adapt new strategies and lay new infrastructure to operate in this climate.
It is not who shouts the loudest but the "healthy" node that can accept and channel interest most effectively that will "win" in this new climate.
Peace,
from PoliticsOnline
Example of how candidates are reaching out to constituents for ideas
New Ideas
By Jack O'Toole
GUEST: Jack O'Toole
According to a recent press release, one candidate for mayor of Los Angeles is trying to use his campaign website as a magnet for new ideas to improve the city:
Bill Wyatt, a candidate for Los Angeles Mayor, has just launched a feature on his website that will pay the public in a contest format for ideas that will make the city better. The Bill Wyatt for Mayor campaign website is located at: www.BillyWyatt.com and the new Get-Paid-To-Play contest is located at: http://billywyatt.com/forum/

Through the internet Bill Wyatt hopes to promote individuals who may have great ideas, but do not have the time or ability to get those ideas into the bureaucratic process. By paying for the ideas Bill Wyatt hopes to parody the Pay-To-Play issue that has absorbed the downtown LA political scene and encourage regular citizens to forward ideas that will broaden the political debate. "I believe in the power of the individual citizen to have solutions to problems that political consultants and strategist may overlook", states Bill.

LINK: Los Angeles Mayoral Candidate, Bill Wyatt, Launches a Get-Paid-To-Play Idea Contest

Monday, January 17, 2005

From PoliticsOnline:
EXPETS SAY CIVIC INVOLVEMENT ON THE WEB WILL INCREASE
Last September, the Pew Internet & American Life Project, a research organization in Washington, sent out a survey asking 24 questions about the future of the Internet to a wide range of technology specialists, scholars and industry leaders. Some 1,200 responded and, as you might expect, widespread agreement is hard to find.
Some 42 percent of respondents agreed with the assertion that civic involvement will increase in the next 10 years as people seek and find organizations to join online; nearly 30 percent disagreed. Roughly 40 percent viewed the proliferation of online medical resources as a potential boon to health care management and access; 30 percent of the specialists thought that unlikely.
More: http://news.com.com/The㗫泹ﮭ몷븢�窗ꝶ쾨鿬↢澲ꋯ骲俶흍1028_3-5518621.html?tag=nefd.top